The Enfield Society


Enfield street names

Based on A guide to Enfield street names, by Graham Dalling. Published about 1982 by the Enfield Preservation Society. (Heritage Series, no. 2). - ISBN 0 907318 01 0. - Now out of print.
Cover of publication

Introduction

Before 1884, when the Enfield Local Board of Health adopted a policy of erecting name plates, street naming in Enfield was in a state of total anarchy. Many streets were known simultaneously by a number of different names, and to add to the confusion there were often cases of several streets having the same name. It is hardly surprising that in 1881, shortly before the census was taken, the Registrar General wrote to the Enfield Local Board of Health complaining about the problems caused to census enumerators by the lack of street name plates and street numbering. The postmen of this period must have had an incredibly difficult time.

In this book I have tried to produce a guide to the street names of Enfield. Obviously, to include every single one would result in a work of unpublishable length. Therefore I have restricted myself to those streets in existence by 1914.

I have attempted to trace all the various names by which the streets have been known and, where possible, to offer some explanation of those names. For residential streets built since 1850, I have tried to ascertain approximately when the road was laid out and the first houses constructed.

The sources used have been many and various. The Enfield Enclosure Award of 1806 with its accompanying maps and the 1754 Tithe Map (at Trinity College, Cambridge) have both yielded up a rich store of names, as has the 1572 Survey of Enfield (at the Public Record Office), Many names have been extracted from the 25-inch to the mile Ordnance Survey Maps of 1867, 1896, and 1914. Other profitable documents were the enumerators' schedules of the 1851 and 1871 censuses. The richest sources of all have been the report books kept by the surveyors to the Enfield Local Board of Health from 1864 to 1893. These contained details of deposited plans and also of inspection visits to building sites, which have therefore provided the construction dates for many streets. Kelly's Enfield Directory from 1899 to 1914 has been very useful in providing the dates when the first houses in a new road were occupied. Another valuable source has been old auctioneers' catalogues and plans.

The area covered is essentially that of the former Borough of Enfield as it stood in 1965, but with certain minor variations. I have included a large area of Cockfosters which was transferred to Southgate in 1934. I have also included the Causeway and Coopers Lane, which were transferred to Potters Bar in 1924. However, I have excluded the part of Monken Hadley village which belonged to Enfield prior to 1894. The street names of this area do not belong in a study of Enfield, from which it is physically isolated, but should more properly be dealt with as part of Monken Hadley and Barnet.

The booklet includes only street names. Generally speaking most of the `terraces', 'cottages' and 'rows' have been excluded for space reasons. They have been included only when they form separate cul-de-sacs, yards or courts.

The booklet is arranged in alphabetical order. Entries have been made under the current name, except for thoroughfares which, for various reasons, have disappeared altogether, leaving no modern successors.

No work of this type can hope to be complete and free from errors. If any reader can add to the information that has been gathered, I shall be glad to hear from them.

Graham Dalling


Acknowledgements

To my colleague David Pam for help and advice and, more particularly, for making available his work on the 1572 Survey of Enfield.

To Eric Liddiard of the Enfield Preservation Society, whose paper on the derivation of some Enfield street names, prepared for the EPS Records and Research group, inspired this publication.

This book is dedicated to the memory of Messrs. Ironside, Lewis and Kitteringham, who successively held the post of Surveyor to the Enfield Local Board of Health. Their report books have provided the main substance of the present text.


Abbreviations used in the text

A.C.
Auctioneers' catalogues. (All the catalogues referred to are held by the London Borough of Enfield Libraries.)
Ce
Census enumerators' schedules. (The London Borough of Enfield Libraries hold microfilm copies of the enumerators' schedules for the censuses of 1841, 1851, 1861 and 1871.)
E.A.
Enfield Enclosure Award. The Enclosure Act was passed in 1801 and the award was drawn up in 1806. (The award and its accompanying maps are held by the London Borough of Enfield Libraries.)
G.B.H.
General Board of Health report on sanitary conditions in Enfield, 1850. (A copy is held by the London Borough of Enfield Libraries.)
K
Kelly's Directory of Enfield published annually 1899-1939. References prior to 1899 are to Kelly's Directory of Middlesex.
O.S.
Ordnance Survey maps, twenty-five inches to the mile, editions of 1867, 1896 and 1914.
R.B.
Report books of the Surveyor to the Enfield Local Board of Health, 1864-1993, (Held by the London Borough of Enfield Libraries.)
S.
1572 Survey of Enfield. (Held by the Public Record Office DL43/7/5.)
T.M.
Enfield Tithe Map, 1754. (The orignal is at Trinity College, Cambridge. A copy is held by the London Borough of Enfield Libraries.)

List of street names


ABERDARE ROAD
In existence by 1903 (K.). The 1914 O.S. shows this and adjoining roads laid out, but no houses built. Nothing was built until after World War I. All the roads on the estate are named after towns in South Wales. See also Glyn Road, Swansea Road, and Brecon Road.
ACACIA ROAD
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. Plans were submitted for houses in 1880. (R.B. 13.5.1880). It appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1887. Many of the roads on the Birkbeck Estate were named after flowers. See also Hawthorn Grove, Myrtle Grove, Lavender Road, Primrose Avenue, Rosemary Avenue, Violet Avenue and Woodbine Grove.
ADELAIDE COTTAGES
These stood to the east of London Road behind the former Florida Cinema. In their early days they had no running water or main drainage (R.B. 30.4.1875). They were probably named after Queen Adelaide, the consort of King William IV.
ADEN ROAD
First mentioned in 1893 when plans for six houses were submitted (R.B. 6.7.1893). Aden became a British colony in 1839.
ALBANY ROAD
In 1890 plans for six houses were submitted (R.B. 27.2.1890). The name probably derives from Leopold, Duke of Albany, a younger son of Queen Victoria who died in 1884.
ALEXANDRA ROAD
In existence by 1909 (K.). Named after Queen Alexandra. An adjoining street is called King Edward's Road.
ALLANDALE ROAD
This road appears on the 1896 O.S. but no houses had yet been built. The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). The eastern end, where it joins Putney Road, was originally named Waverley Road. Allandale is a small village in Northumberland.
ALLENS ROAD
First houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
ALLISON'S ALLEY
Situated on the west of Baker Street, close to Bell Road (K. 1899).
ALMA ROAD
Land was purchased here for the Enfield Waterworks in 1855. The road is clearly marked on the 1867 0.S. The Battle of the Alma, one of the opening encounters of the Crimean War, was fought in 1854.
ALMSHOUSE LANE
Leading north from Turkey Street to Crowe's Almshouses.
ALPHA ROAD
It appears on the 1896 O.S. Probably built C. 1893/4.
ANDERSON'S YARD
A group of exceptionally squalid cottages situated on the west side of Baker Street approximately opposite Churchbury Road (G.B.H.). The name probably derives from Edward Anderson, a carrier with a business in Baker Street (K. 1845). They were demolished in 1960.
ARMFIELD ROAD
Laid out by 1909 (K.). The Armfield Road Hall was opened in September 1909.
ASHTON ROAD
Plans for building four cottages were submitted in 1889 (R.B. 19.9.1889). The road is shown partly built on the 1896 O.S.
THE AVENUES
An unusual instance of the numbering as opposed to the naming of roads. This is common practice in the U.S.A. but relatively rare in Great Britain. FIRST AVENUE appears on the 1896 0.S. with houses on the east side only. The same map shows SECOND AVENUE complete. Plans for four houses in FOURTH AVENUE were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 9.12.1880). FIFTH AVENUE also dates from 1880 when plans for ten cottages were submitted. (R.B. 25.11.1880). SIXTH AVENUE began life in 188 with plans for forty-one cottages (R.B. 17.3.1883). Plans were submitted for four cottages in SEVENTH AVENUE in 1884 (R.B. 9.5.1884). THIRD AVENUE was not built until 1927.
AYLAND GREEN
A small triangular green formerly at the junction of Millmarsh Lane and Stockingswater Lane (E.A. 1806). An alternative spelling is Aland Green (T.M. 1754).
BAKER STREET
So-called in 1754 (T.M.) However Rocque's map of Middlesex, also of 1754, calls it Beaker Street. It was known as Bakers Street in 1572 (S.). There is also a Baker Street in Potters Bar.
BARTRAMS LANE
Called Windsor Road on the 1896 0.S. The present name derives from Bartram Quash, a nearby patch of woodland.
BATLEY ROAD
The present name was acquired in 1909 (K.). It derives from Jonathan William Battley who lived at Laurel Bank on the South side of Lancaster Road (K.1867). It was previously known as Blossom's Alley. In 1850 the only sanitation was in the form of an open ditch (G.B.H.) The name of Blossom probably derives from Robert Blossom, the first of the four husbands of Agnes Myddleton who founded a chantry in St. Andrew's Church in 1471. The chantry foundation later developed into Enfield Grammar School.
BAXTER'S YARD
A group of cottages situated off Baker Street probably somewhere in the Gordon Road/Churchbury Road area. In 1870 they were reported to be in an advanced stage of dilapidation. They were owned by Ebenezer Gibbons. (R.B. 23.9.1870). One Henry Baxter was in business as a grocer and cheesemonger in Baker Street in 1845 (K.).
BEACONSFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1902 (K.). The portion between Rotherfield and Uckfield Roads was first occupied in 1904 and until 1909 was known as Heathfield Road (K.). The Ordnance Road end is very much older. It is marked on the 1867 0.S. and was called Alma Road. The name suggests a date of C. 1855. Most of the roads in this vicinity have names ending in 'field'. See also Catisfield Road, Rotherfield Road, Titchfield Road, Uckfield Road and Chesterfield Road.
BEDFORD ROAD
This road was in existence by 1887 when it was reported to be suffering from inadequate drainage (R.B. 23.6.1887). It is marked on the 1896 O.S.
BEECH HILL
The name derives from Beech Hill Park whose northern boundary it forms. The road was called Beech Hill in 1851 (Ce.). The names Beech Hill and Camlet Way were used indiscriminately.
BELL LANE
Originated as a cart track giving access to Eastfield from the Hertford Road. Houses had been built by 1871 (Ce.). In 1878 drainage problems gave rise to insanitary conditions (R.B. 22.11.1878). The name derives from the adjacent Bell P.H. It was sometimes called Bell Road.
BELL ROAD
The 1896 O.S. shows the road laid out but still un-named and with no houses. The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.). The name derives from the Old Bell P.H. in Baker Street.
BERT WAY
Built 1914 (K.). An unusually uninspired piece of naming.
BERTRAM ROAD
Shown, partly built, on the 1896 0.S.
BIRKBECK ROAD
The Birkbeck Estate was developed by the Birkbeck Freehold Land Society. General plans were submitted in 1878 (R.B. 6.12.1878). Plans for houses in Birkbeck Road were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 13.5.1880). The road is shown partly built on the 1896 O.S. There were problems with jerry-building on this estate.
BONNET'S YARD
A group of cottages situated on the west side of Baker Street near Churchbury Road. The cottages were regarded as a health hazard in 1850 (G.B.H.). In 1872 they were condemned by the Enfield Local Board of Health (R.B. 28.3.1872). The name probably commemorated a former owner.
BOTANY BAY
The name appears on Greenwood's map of Middlesex (1829). The settlement grew up after the enclosure of Enfield Chase in 1777. The name is obviously an ironic allusion to its remote situation. (Botany Bay, Australia, was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and the convict settlement was founded in 1788).
BRADLEY ROAD
Plans were submitted in 1878 (R.B. 18.1.1878). The developer was a Mr. Henry Bradley of no 51, Bishopsgate. Whatever else Mr. Bradley may have been, no-one can accuse him of being self-effacing.
BRECON ROAD
Laid out by 1909 (K). but no houses had been built by 1914 (0.S.). The area was not built up until after World War I. See also Aberdare Road, Glyn Road and Swansea Road.
BRICK LANE
So-called on the 1867 O.S. It is mentioned (but not named) in the Enclosure Award of 1809. The name is a reminder of the many brickworks formerly in East Enfield.
BRIDGENHALL ROAD
Plans were submitted in 1878 for two villas to be built in what was then known as Bridgen Road (R.B. 16.8.1878). The road appears on the 1896 O.S. under the name of Morley Road. It had acquired its present name by 1899 (K.). The name derives from Bridgen Hall which stands at the junction of Russell Road and Hallside Road. It was the home of William Bridgen, Lord Mayor of London in 1764.
BRIGADIER AVENUE
The road was under construction in 1907 and the first houses were occupied by 1908. (K.)
BRIGADIER HILL
The name was in use by 1850 (G.B.H. and C.1851). The name was sometimes applied to parts of Phipps Hatch Lane and Cocker Lane. Brigadier Hill House occupied the site of St. Luke's Church (U.S. 1867). In 1722 a Brigadier Franks was living in a house on Enfield Chase (P.R.O.: DL9/22).
BRIMSDOWN AVENUE
First occupied in 1899 (K.). The name of Brimsdown/Grimsdown derives from a field formerly situated to the north of Green Street.
BRODIE ROAD
Part of the Cedars Estate. Plans for two houses were submitted in 1888 (R.B. 6.6.1888).
BROWNING ROAD
Formerly known as Cocker Lane. This name appears on the 1754 Tithe Map and on the 1777 Chase Enclosure Map. The name Browning Road was in use by 1892 (R.B. 2.6.1892). It derives from the family of one Richard Browning who lived on Brigadier Hill (K.1845). The name Browning was originally only applied to the section between Lancaster Road and Phipps Hatch Lane. The section between Phipps Hatch and Clay Hill retained the name Cocker Lane until 1908 (K.).
BULLS CROSS
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). The name probably derives from a former wayside cross. It was known as Bulls Cross Lane in 1572 (S.)
BULLSMOOR LANE
Called Belsmoor Lane in 1754 (T.M.)
BURLEIGH ROAD
Part of the Moat House Estate bought by the Conservative Land Society C.1854. The road had been laid out by 1867 (O.S.). The first houses were not occupied until 1901 (K.). See also Queens Road and Stanley Road.
BURLINGTON ROAD
Part of the Woodlands Estate. Plans for eighteen cottages were deposited in 1883 (R.B. 2.3.1883).
BYCULLAH AVENUE
The Bycullah Estate developed from 1878. Bycullah Avenue is marked on an auctioneer's plan of 1888. It is possibly the road referred to in 1880 as Avenue Road (R.B. 13.5.1880).
BYCULLAH ROAD
The first plans for the Bycullah Estate were deposited in 1878 (R.B. 1.11.1878). The developer was Mr. Culloden Rowan. (See Rowantree Road and Culloden Road). The name derives from Bycullah House, part of whose grounds it once formed. Bycullah is a suburb of Bombay. Col.J. R. Riddell who died at Bycullah House in 1825 was a former Indian Army officer.
CAMLET WAY
So-called on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777. The name derives from Camlet Moat which lies to the south of Hadley Road. The western end of Camlet Way near Hadley Common was sometimes referred to as Hadley Gate (Ce. 1851).
CANONBURY ROAD
Shown partly built on the 1896 0.S. The site was previously occupied by the Cannon Brewery.
CARR'S LANE
The name derives from William Carr, an early 19th century owner of Chase Park,- a house formerly standing to the south of Windmill Hill. It formed part of the drive to Old Park from the foot of Windmill Hill. See also Old Park Avenue.
CARTERHATCH LANE
'Hatch' clearly refers to a former gate. The road was also known as Potash Lane and is so-called in an auctioneer's catalogue of 1787. A Potash House is marked on Rocque's map of Middlesex (1754). In 1572 it was known by its present name, but was, also known as Syms Lane (S.).
CARTERHATCH ROAD
Plans for twelve houses were deposited in 1890 (R.B. 8.5.1890). The 1896 0.S. shows the road laid out but with only a few houses at the Hertford Road end. It partly follows the alignment of an early road called Pigot's Lane (T.M. 1754). This, from being a fully fledged road, had degenerated into a farm track by 1867.
CAT HILL
This road is mostly in East Barnet. The present name derives from the Cat P.H. which formerly stood at the foot of the hill. It was sometimes known as Belmont Road (R.B. 7.3.1876). Belmont was a large house standing in the angle between Cat Hill and Cockfosters Road.
CATHERINE ROAD
Plans were submitted for two houses in 1891 (R.B. 30.4.1891).
CATISFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
CATTLEGATE ROAD
So-called in the Enclosure Award of 1806. The name derives from Cattle Gate, a former gate to Enfield Chase, situated at the junction of Cattlegate Road and Cooper's Lane Road. The gate derived its name from Cathale Priory, an obscure religious foundation on the border between Enfield and Northaw. (See East Herts. Archaeological Society Trans., Vol VI, pp. 90-7). The eastern end of the road was sometimes known as Crews Hill (O.S. 1867).
THE CAUSEWAY
Originally in Enfield but transferred to Potters Bar in 1924. The name was in use in the eighteen-seventies (R.B. 27.2.1872). The name suggests that the roadway was raised to prevent flooding. The area certainly suffered from bad drainage. The road was sometimes known as Chequers Lane (K.1924) from the Chequers P.H. See also Cooper's Lane.
CECIL AVENUE
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
CECIL ROAD
Part of the Enfield New Town development. The National Freehold Land Society bought the land in 1852 and commenced building a year later (A.C.). All the streets were named after Elizabethan worthies. (See also Essex Road, Raleigh Road and Sydney Road). Cecil Road originally comprised the section between London Road and Raleigh Road. The section between Raleigh Road and Church Street was proposed in 1900 (A.C.). and laid out by 1901 (K.). It was originally intended to name the section between Church Street and the Town Park gates, Chase Side Avenue (A.C. 1900).
CEDAR AVENUE
The road was laid out by 1907 (K.). The 1914 O.S. shows the road with no houses yet built. It was originally called Cedar Road.
CEDAR ROAD
Originally called Cemetery Road. Lavender Hill Cemetery was opened in 1872. A building notice was submitted for some cottages in 1879 (R.B. 25.7.1879).
CEDAR PARK ROAD
Part of the Cedars Estate, built on land formerly belonging to a large house called the Cedars on Brigadier Hill. Work commenced about 1888 when a water main was laid (R.B. 27.9.1888). The 1896 O.S. shows the road only partly built.
CHALK LANE
Marked on the 1777 Chase Enclosure Map, but not named. The name appears on the 1867 O.S. The origin of the name is obscure as the subsoil consists of clay and gravel, but no chalk.
CHAPEL STREET
Formerly known as Love's Row. It was a very unhealthy neighbourhood suffering from bad drainage and water supply (G.B.H. 1850). There was an outbreak of cholera here in 1866.
CHARLES STREET
Part of the Cardigan Estate. Plans for twenty houses were submitted in 1892 (R.B. 18.2.1892).
CHASE COURT GARDENS
The first houses were occupied in 1909 (K.). The name derives from Chase Court, a house formerly standing in Chase Hill.
CHASE GREEN AVENUE
Plans for a house were submitted in 1881 (R.B. 2.6.1881). In 1888 some building plots were sold (A.C.).
CHASE HILL
This was originally a more important road than today, stretching right through to Chase Green. The eastern end was obliterated by the Cuffley extension of the Great Northern Railway, opened in 1910. It was sometimes known as Harrison's Lane (R.B. 8.4.1886). Daniel Harrison, J.P. (1801-73) lived at Chase Hill House.
CHASE RIDINGS
Part of the Uplands Park Estate. A water main was laid in 1885 (R.B. 2.1.1885). The 1896 O.S. shows houses at the Slades Hill end.
CHASE SIDE
So-called because it formed the eastern boundary of Enfield Chase. (Chase Side, Southgate formed part of the western boundary). The northern end was sometimes known as the Holly Bush after the public house of that name (G.B.H. and Ce. 1851). In 1572 it was known as Little Woodside (S).
CHASE SIDE CRESCENT
Formerly known as Union Road (R.B. 7.3.1876) and Infirmary Road (K. 1914). Both these names reflect the Poor Law origins of St. Michael's Hospital.
CHASEWOOD AVENUE
First occupied in 1909 (K.).
CHESTERFIELD ROAD
Contemporary with the school, opened in January 1897.
CHESTNUT ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.).
THE CHINE
Part of the Grange Park Estate. The developer was Richard Metherell who lived at Elmscott on Bush Hill. The first houses in the Chine were advertised in the Southgate Recorder, June 1908. The name strongly suggests that Metherell may have spent his holidays in Bournemouth.
CHURCH LANE
So-called in 1841 (Ce.). It is marked on the Enclosure Award Map of 1806. It adjoins St. Andrew's Churchyard and Vicarage.
CHURCH ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). The name reflects the close proximity of St. Matthew's Church, built in 1878.
CHURCH STREET
This road was sometimes included as part of the Town (Ce. 1851). It was sometimes referred to as High Street (R.B. 9.6.1870 and Ce. 1871). The present name reflects the proximity of St. Andrew's Church.
CHURCHBURY LANE
Made up from an old field track (E.A. 1806). The name derives from Churchbury Field which adjoined it on the west. An alternative name was Cherry Orchard Lane, deriving from the orchards that formerly lined the road.
CHURCHBURY ROAD
Formerly known as Back Lane (R.B. 12.10.1893). A building notice for three cottages was lodged in 1879 (R.B. 18.12.1879).
CLARENCE ROAD
Under construction 1905. First houses occupied in 1906 (K.). Probably named after Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence, the elder son of King Edward VII, who died in 1892.
CLAY HILL
So-called on the 1754 Tithe Map. The name was in use in 1572 (S.). The portion adjoining the Rose and Crown was also known as Bridge Street (S.). This name was still occasionally used in legal documents as late at the early 19th century.
CLIVE ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.). Probably named after Lord Clive, the conqueror of Bengal.
CLIVE WAY
Originally known as Shepherd Road (K. 1911). Re-named Clive Way by 1914 (K.).
COCKFOSTERS ROAD
So-called on the 1896 O.S. It was sometimes known as Southgate Road (R.B. 8.11.1872). It originally stretched as far south as the junction with Green Road. In 1935 Southgate Council re-named the stretch between Green Road and Cat Hill, incorporating it into Chase Side. (This area had been transferred from Enfield to Southgate in 1934). The change of name was carried out under pressure from the Post Office.
COLLEGE ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1910 (K.).
COLMORE ROAD
The 1896 O.S. shows the road in outline. It was occupied by 1899 (K.).
CONCORD ROAD
Built by 1909 (K.). Originally called Commercial Road.
CONICAL CORNER
So-called in 1851 (Ce.). The name obviously derives from the distinctive shape of this corner of Chase Green.
CONNOP ROAD
Six houses were under construction in 1889 (R.B. 30.5.1889). The Connop family were major landowners in East Enfield in the early 19th century.
COOPER'S LANE
Prior to 1924 this road was partly in Northaw and partly in Enfield. In that year the Enfield portion was transferred to Potters Bar. The road is marked on Morden's Map of Middlesex (1695) under its present name. The area near the Chequers P.H. contained some very insanitary cottages (R.B. 19.8.1880).
COOPER'S LANE ROAD
Marked but not named on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777. It had acquired its present name by 1806 (E.A.). At its southern end it links up with Cooper's Lane.
CRADDOCK ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1909 (K.).
CRESCENT EAST and CRESCENT WEST
Originally called Crescent Road. A building lease was granted by the Duchy of Lancaster in 1882. Hadley Wood Station was opened in 1885. It had been divided into Crescent East and Crescent West by 1911 (K.).
CRESCENT ROAD
Part of the Old Park Estate. Plans were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 24.6.1880). See also Old Park Road and Waverley Road.
CROMWELL TERRACE
A row of cottages situated off the west side of Baker Street, south of the junction with Lancaster Road. The cottages belonged to Ebenezer Gibbons (See Baxter's Yard). Water was laid on to the cottages in 1879 (R.B. 30.5.1879). They were demolished in 1961.
CROSS ROAD
In existence by 1904 (K.).
CULLODEN ROAD
Part of the Bycullah Estate which was developed from 1878. It was named after Mr. Culloden Rowan, the developer. See Bycullah Road.
DERBY ROAD
Part of the Lincoln House Estate. Drains were laid in 1871 (R.B. 23.6.1871). Houses were under construction in 1872 (R.B. 30.8.1872). The road was probably named after the 14th Earl of Derby, prime minister 1852, 1858-9 and 1866-8.
DOWNS ROAD
The 1896 O.S. shows the Lincoln Road end laid out but with no houses built. The road was occupied by 1899 (K.).
DRAKE STREET
Part of the Laurel Bank Estate. The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built with houses on the west side only. See also Laurel Bank Road. The road was probably named after Sir Francis Drake.
DRAPERS ROAD
A water main was laid in 1876 (R.B. 28.4.1876). The first houses were occupied by 1903 (K.). The land was formerly owned by Henry Draper who farmed on the Ridgeway (K. 1867).
DUCK LEES LANE
Called Duck Leys Lane in an auctioneer's catalogue of 1787. The name reflects the low-lying and marshy nature of the ground.
DURANTS ROAD
Developed from 1888 when plans for one house were submitted (R.B. 5.8.1888). The road is named after Durants Arbor, a large house formerly standing on the south side of the Ride.
EAST CRESCENT
Shown partially built on the 1896 O.S.
EAST LODGE LANE
Marked on the Enfield Chase Enclosure map of 1777. The name comes from East Lodge, a former Lodge of the Chase, which stands in the angle between East Lodge Lane and the Ridgeway. It was sometimes known as Red Lodge Lane (Ce. 1871).
EAST ROAD
Marked on the 1867 O.S. It was sometimes known as East Street (Ce. 1871).
EASTFIELD ROAD
The road was built on part of East Field, one of the former common fields of Enfield. Work started on laying drains in 1872 (R.B. 2.8.1872). The 1896 O.S. shows houses on the north side only.
ELMHURST ROAD
Occupied by 1899 (K.).
ELMORE ROAD
The road was laid out in 1873 (R.B. 10.1.1873). Pigot's Directory (1839) includes a Mr. W. C. Elmore who lived at Enfield Wash.
ENFIELD ROAD
In 1806 it was known as East Barnet Road (E.A.) and retained the name until 1932 when the present name was applied. The Southgate portion was re-named Bramley Road in 1934 after representations from the Post Office. (The Bramley family farmed at West Pole Farm). The road was also sometimes known as Chase Road (Ce. 1851).
ESSEX ROAD
Part of the Enfield New Town development commenced in 1853. See Cecil Road. EVAN'S YARD A group of cottages situated off Baker Street near the Hop Poles (Ce. 1851). The cottages, owned by Ebenezer Gibbons, were reported to be in an advanced state of decay in 1877 (R.B. 6.7.1877). The name probably commemorated a former owner.
FAIRFIELD ROAD
Plans for five houses were submitted in 1881 (R.B. ]7.3.1881).
FAIRVIEW ROAD
A water main was laid in 1885 (R.B. 19.9.1885).
FALCON ROAD
Plans for one cottage were submitted in 1885 (R.B. 19.9.1885). The name derives from the Falcon P.H. in South Street.
FALMER ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1902 (K.). Falmer is a village in Sussex.
FARR ROAD
The first house was occupied in 1904 (K.). A Richard Charles Farr had a building business in Chase Side in 1867 (K.).
FERNDALE ROAD
Under construction in 1891 when one of the houses was found to have defective drains (R.B. 17.3.1891). Ferndale is the name of a village in Glamorgan.
FERNY HILL
The Enfield Chase Enclosure Map (1777) shows a tract of land to the south of Hadley Road called Ferney Hills.
FLASH LANE
So-called from the flash or aqueduct that carried the New River over the Cuffley Brook.
FLORENCE AVENUE
The first houses were occupied in 1908 (K.). The name is taken from Florence House which formerly stood in Chase Hill.
FOREST ROAD
The 1896 0.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. The first houses were occupied by 1899 (K.).
FORTY HILL
Called Forty Green on Morden's Map of Middlesex (1695). The names Forty Hill and Forty Greene were both in use in 1572 (S.).
FOTHERINGHAM ROAD
Six houses were under construction in 1892 (R.B. 15.12.1892).
FYFIELD ROAD
Part of the New River Estate. The 1896 O.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. The first houses had been occupied by 1899 (K.).
GAMES YARD
A group of highly unhealthy cottages situated off Chase Side near the Holly Bush (G.B.H. and Ce. 1851). One George Game was in business as a poulterer in Baker Street in 1845 (K.).
GARFIELD ROAD
Plans for three cottages were submitted in 1888 (R.B. 18.1.1888). The name may have been derived from James Abram Garfield, president of the U.S.A., assassinated in 1881.
GARNAULT ROAD
Part of the Bridgen Hall Estate sold for building in 1868 (A.G.). It developed very slowly. Garnault Road was originally known as Avenue Road. Plans for three houses were deposited in 1886 (R.B. 30.6.1886). The present name derives from the Garnaults, a Huguenot family who owned Bowling Green House, the predecessor of Myddelton House.
GENOTIN ROAD
Originally known as Station Road (R.B. 10.10.1873).
GENTLEMAN'S ROW
The present name is self-explanatory. The roadway was sometimes known as Archway Road (R.B. 21.2.1873) and also Archway Place (R.B. 7.3.1876). These both refer to the former Archway Tavern, now Archway House. The northern end was formerly known as Williams Place (K. 1899).
GILBERT STREET
Sometimes known as Gilbert Road. A building notice was submitted in 1877 (R.B. 20.4.1877). The name is possibly connected with Mark Gilbert who was an estate agent in Enfield Wash (K.1899).
GLEBE AVENUE
Plans for the road and sewer were deposited in 1880 (R.B. 13.5.1880). The road was built on former glebe land.
GLENVILLE AVENUE
Part of the Cedars Estate. Shown partly built on the 1896 O.S. The Brigadier Hill end was originally called Avenue Road (K. 1899).
GLOUCESTER ROAD
Part of the Cedars Estate. The road is shown on the 1896 O.S. but no house had yet been built. The first houses were occupied by 1899 (K.).
GLYN ROAD
The road had been laid out by 1905 (K.), but no houses were built until after World War I. See Aberdare Road, Brecon Road and Swansea Road.
GOAT LANE
So-called from the former Goat P.H. which stood at the junction of Goat Lane and Forty Hill.
GOLDSDOWN ROAD
The present name, acquired in 1903 (K.), derives from the name of a field that lay to the north of Green Street. In 1806 it was known as Watery Lane (E.A.). An auctioneer's catalogue of 1775 calls it Lower Watry Lane. This is clearly derived from the marshy nature of the ground. The name Watery Lane was formerly used for Angel Road, Edmonton, a similarly low-lying area.
GORDON HILL
Shown in outline but not named on the 1867 0.S. In 1870 it was known as Conduit Road (R.B. 7.10.1870) from the former conduit supplied from a well at the top of the hill. It was later known as Upper Gordon Road (R.B. 2.3.1877). The present name appears on the 1896 O.S. The name is derived from Gordon House which formerly stood on the east side of Chase Side.
GORDON ROAD
Part of the Gordon House Estate. In 1858 Gordon House had been demolished, the roads had been laid out and one house built. (See John Tuff - Historical Notices of Enfield, p. 212.) The Chase Side end was known as Lower Gordon Road to distinguish it from Upper Gordon Road (Gordon Hill). The Baker Street end was known either as Fighting Cocks Lane (Ce. 1851) or Gordon Lane (K. 1899). See also Halifax Road and Gordon Hill.
GRAEME ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901. It was originally a cul-de-sac from Baker Street, but was later extended beyond Churchbury Lane.
THE GRANGEWAY
Part of Richard Metherell's Grange Park Estate. (See the Chine.) The first properties were occupied in 1910 (K.).
GRANVILLE ROAD
In existence by 1911 (K.).
GREEN DRAGON LANE
The present name comes from the Green Dragon P.H. which formerly stood at the junction of Green Lanes and Green Dragon Lane. It appears in this position on the Edmonton Enclosure Map of 1801/2. In 1754 it was called Filcaps Lane (T.M.). (Filcaps Farm stood on the north side near Landra Gardens.) Cary's Map of Middlesex (1789) shows it as Chace Lane. The Edmonton Enclosure Award of 1801/2 calls it Old Park Road. (It formed the southern boundary of Old Park.) Henrietta Cresswell, writing in 1912, calls it Dog Kennel Lane. A document of 1721 in the Public Record Office refers to the cutting down of an oak tree near the dog kennel on the Chase (DL9/21). The portion between Old Park Ridings and Green Lanes was known earlier in this century as Grange Drive.
GREEN ROAD
Prior to 1934 this marked the southern boundary of the Enfield portion of Cockfosters. It appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1853. It was part of a scheme to develop the area bounded by Chase Side, Chase Road and Bramley Road. The scheme was not a success. No houses were built in Green Road until after World War I.
GREEN STREET
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). At its eastern end lay Ayland Green. It was known as Greene Streete in 1572 (S.).
THE GROVE
Part of the Uplands Park Estate. The road is shown in outline on the 1896 0.S. but no houses were occupied until 1909 (K.).
GROVE PLACE
Shown on the 1867 O.S.
GROVE ROAD
In existence by 1867 (O.S.).
GROVE ROAD WEST
Marked on the 1867 O.S. This area suffered from bad drainage. It was sometimes known as Brace's Alley (R.B. 16.10.1879).
HADLEY ROAD
So-called in 1806 (E.A.). It was sometimes known as Barnet Road (Ce. 1871).
HALIFAX ROAD
Part of the Gordon House Estate. The road seems to have been developed in the early eighteen seventies. It is not listed in the 1871 census. In 1879 there was an outbreak of typhoid in this and adjoining roads. It was named after Sir Thomas Halifax who lived in Chase Side and was mentioned in the Enfield Chase Enclosure Act of 1777. See also Gordon Hill and Gordon Road.
HALSTEAD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
HARMAN ROAD
Part of the Cardigan Estate which was developed from 1892. (See under Charles Street.)
HARTINGTON ROAD
Built by 1896 (0.S.) It was probably named after Spencer Compton Cavendish, Marquess of Hartington, a leading figure in the Liberal governments of 1868-74 and 1880-85. The road was demolished in the mid sixties to make way for the Brigadier Hill Council estate.
HARWAY GREEN
Formerly situated off Mill Marsh Lane (T.M. 1754).
HAWTHORN GROVE
Part of the Birkbeck Estate which was developed from 1880. Plans for two cottages were submitted in 1884 (R.B. 19.7.1884).
HEENE ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). Heene is part of Worthing, Sussex.
HERTFORD ROAD
Literally the road to Hertford. Alternative forms were Ware Road (R.B. 10.5.1870) and Waltham Road (R.B. 26.7.1872). It was not 'officially' called Hertford Road until 1910 (K.). Before 1910 it was known in its various parts as Enfield Highway, Enfield Wash and Freezywater. In 1572 Enfield Wash was known as Horsepoolstones Street and Enfield Highway was known as Cocksmiths End (S.).
HIGH STREET
So-called in 1851 (Ce.). It was occasionally referred to as Edmonton Road (Ce. 1871).
HOE LANE
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). The eastern end was sometimes known as Magpie Lane and the junction with the Hertford Road known as Magpie Corner (Ce. 1871 and R.B. 13.9.1872). In 1572 it was known as Hoo Lane (S.).
HOLLY ROAD
Plans for a pair of villas were deposited in 1889 (R.B. 16.5.1889). The road is shown partly built on the 1896 O.S.
HOLLY WALK
So-called in 1851 (Ce.). In 1572 it was known as Church Way (S.).
HOLMWOOD ROAD
Plans for one house were submitted in 1891 (R.B. 16.7.1891). The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built. An auctioneer's plan of 1862 shows a proposed development approximately on the line of Holmwood Road. It was to be called Nursery Road. It was never built.
HOLTWHITE AVENUE
This road is marked in outline on an auctioneer's plan of 1897 but is not named. The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.).
HOLTWHITES HILL
Called Parsonage Lane Road in 1806 (E.A.). This name also appears on the 1867 O.S. The present name derives from Thomas Holt White who lived at Chase Lodge which stood on the south side of the road. He died in 1841 and was buried at Harlow, Essex.
HORSE SHOE LANE
So-called in 1851 (Ce.). The name is derived from the Crown and Horseshoes P.H.
INGERSOLL ROAD
The road was laid out in 1873 (R.B. 10.1.1873). The name is probably connected with a Mr. Riley Thomas Ingersoll who was living at Enfield Highway in 1867 (K.). See also Riley Road.
IRELAND GREEN
An area to the south of South Street. So-called on Rocque's Map of Middlesex (1754). See also Scotland Green.
JAMES STEET
Part of the Cardigan Estate which was developed from 1889. Some of the houses were jerry-built (R.B. 30.5.1889).
JASPER ROAD
The road appears on the 1867 0.S. It has recently been re-named Jasper Close.
JOHN STREET
Part of the Cardigan Estate which was developed from 1889.
KIMBERLEY GARDENS
Under construction in 1904. The first houses were occupied in 1905 (K.). Kimberley is a major centre of diamond mining in South Africa. The town played a major part in the Boer War which ended in 1902. (See also Mafeking Road and Ladysmith Road.) KING EDWARD'S ROAD The first houses were occupied in 1902, the year of the coronation of King Edward VII.
KINGSWAY
Built in 1908. It was originally called Station Avenue (K.). The name was changed to Kingsway in 1910 (K.), doubtless a reflection of the enthusiasm felt about the approaching coronation of King George V.
KYNASTON ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). Kynaston is a village in Shropshire near Oswestry.
LADBROKE ROAD
Under construction in 1905. The first houses were occupied in 1906 (K.). Most of the road was in Edmonton.
LADYSMITH ROAD
Under construction in 1903. The first houses were occupied in 1905 (K.). Ladysmith is a town in South Africa which stood a long siege in the Boer War which ended in 1902. (See also Kimberley Road and Mafeking Road.) The road originally stretched only as far north as Sketty Road. It was extended to Carterhatch Lane in the thirties.
LANCASTER AVENUE
Part of the Beech Hill Park Estate, developed from 1882. The 1896 O.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. The land at Hadley Wood was formerly owned by the Duchy of Lancaster.
LANCASTER ROAD
Originally known as New Lane (T.M. 1754). It was re-named Lancaster Road by the Enfield Local Board of Health 27.10.1887. (The Duchy of Lancaster held the Manor of Enfield).
LANDRA GARDENS
The northern end is shown on the 1914 O.S. It had not yet been named and no houses had been built.
LANDSEER ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1904 (K.). It was named after the painter Sir Edwin Landseer (1802-72). (See also Millais Road, Poynter Road and Leighton Road. )
LAUREL BANK ROAD
Part of the Laurel Bank Estate. Plans were submitted in 1885 (R.B. 14.3.1885) by the Metropolitan Land Company. The 1896 O.S. shows the road laid out, but with no houses as yet. The name derives from Laurel Bank, a house formerly occupying the site. (See also Drake Street, Lea Street, Lynn Street and Walton Street).
LAURENCE ROAD
The 1896 O.S. shows the road under construction with houses on the east side only.
LAVENDER HILL
In 1806 it was known as New Lane Road (E.A.). By 1850 it was known as Lavender Hill (G.B.H.). An adjoining area, used for the cultivation of lavender, was known as the Lavender fields (G.B.H.).
LAVENDER ROAD
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. The road is marked on an auctioneer's plan of 1887. Plans for one house were submitted in 1891 (R.B. 7.5.1891).
LAWSON ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1904 (K.).
LAYARD ROAD
Plans for a house in this road were rejected in 1893 because of inadequate water supply (R.B. 23.2.1893). The name is probably derived from Sir Austen Henry Layard (1817-94) a distinguished archaeologist.
LEA ROAD
Part of the Laurel Bank Estate. The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built with only a few houses at the west end.
LEIGHTON ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1904 (K.). The road was named after Frederick, Lord Leighton (1830-96) an eminent painter and president of the Royal Academy. See also Landseer Road, Millais Road and Poynter Road.
LINCOLN ROAD
This road has been known by more names than any other in Enfield. Alternative forms include Ayley Croft Lane (Ce. 1851), Brick Kiln Lane (E.A. 1806), Brickfield Lane (A.C. 1869), Bungers Lane (T.M. 1752), Red Lane (A.C. 1847) and Joan Potter's Lane (Teesdale Map 1842). The first and last of these are derived from the names of fields adjoining the road. It was known as Bungeys Lane in 1572 (S). The present name dates from 1870 (R.B. 7.10.1870). It was originally applied only to the eastern end of the road, developed 1870-72 as part of the Lincoln House Estate. The road was officially re-named Lincoln Road - from end to end on 20th June 1888 by the Enfield Local Board of Health.
LITTLE PARK GARDENS
Little Park, Gentlemans Row, was purchased in 1888 for £4000 by the Enfield Local Board of Health for use as offices. The grounds were developed as Little Park Gardens. Plans for five houses were deposited in 1888 (R.B. 27.9.1888).
LONDON ROAD
This was formerly part of the turnpike road to London maintained by the Stamford Hill and Green Lanes Turnpike Trust. It was called London Lane in 1754 (T.M.). This name was still in use in 1851 (Ce.). It had acquired its present name by 1871 (Ce.). In 1572 it was known as London Way (S.).
LYNN STREET
Part of the Laurel Bank Estate. The 1896 O.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built as yet. The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
MAFEKING ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1909. Mafeking is a town in South Africa which stood a long siege in the Boer War. (See also Kimberley Road and Ladysmith Road.)
MAIN AVENUE
Plans for four houses were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 28.5.1880). (See also the Avenues.)
MALVERN ROAD
The 1896 0.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
MANDEVILLE ROAD
Part of the Putney Lodge Estate which was sold for building in 1867 (A.C.). The road was partly built by 1871 (Ce.). The northern end was originally known as Mandeville Crescent. The Mandevilles were lords of the Manor of Enfield after the Norman conquest.
MANOR ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
MARKET PLACE
Created in 1632 when the parish bought a house called The Vine, the site of which was adapted as a market place. See also Vine Lane.
MAXIM ROAD
Shown in outline of the 1914 O.S., but not yet named. It is probably named after Sir Hiram Maxim (1840-1916), the inventor of the Maxim gun.
MAYFIELD ROAD
Plans for four houses were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 5.6.1890).
MEDCALF ROAD
Probably built in the early eighteen-sixties. It is marked on the 1867 O.S. In 1867 Benjamin Medcalf was landlord of the Greyhound in Ordnance Road (K.).
MEETING HOUSE YARD
A group of cottages formerly situated on the east of Baker Street adjoining the Baptist Chapel. The cottages were in a very bad state in 1850. There was no drainage whatever and some of the tenants were keeping pigs in the cottages (G.B.H.). This part of Baker Street has been associated with nonconformist worship since the late 17th century.
MERTON ROAD
Part of the Woodlands Estate, developed from 1883. The 1896 0.S. shows the road complete. It was originally called Melville Road, but acquired its present name in 1911 (K.).
MILLMARSH LANE
The road led from Green Street to Mill Marsh. Mill Marsh was so-called in 1754 (T.M.).
MILLAIS ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). It was named after John Everett Millais (1829-96), an eminent painter and president of the Royal Academy. See also Landseer Road, Leighton Road and Poynter Road.
MORLEY HILL
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. Plans for two houses were deposited in 1881 (R.B. 8.4.1881). Possibly named after John Morley (1838-1923), a leading Liberal politician.
MYRTLE GROVE
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. It appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1887. The 1896 0.S. shows the road partly built.
NAGS HEAD ROAD
Plans for seven houses were submitted in 1890 (R.B. 3.7.1890). It forms an eastern continuation of Southbury Road which prior to 1882 was known as Nags Head Lane. See also Southbury Road.
NAPIER ROAD
The 1867 O.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. It was probably named after Field-Marshal Lord Napier (1810-90), who played a leading part in the suppression of the Indian Mutiny.
NELSON ROAD
Part of the Falcon Estate developed from 1885. See Falcon Road. It was probably named after Lord Nelson.
NEW ROAD
Shown in outline on the 1867 O.S. No houses had yet been built.
NORTHAMPTON ROAD
Plans were deposited for five houses in 1881 (R.B. 15.7.1881).
NORTHFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1911 (K.). The western part of the road was originally known as Rutland Road.
NUNNS ROAD
Formerly known as Manor House Road (K.1909).
OAK AVENUE
Built on land attached to Ridgeway Oaks which was sold for building in 1389 (A.C.). The plan shows Oak Avenue. The first houses were not occupied until 1907 (K.).
OAKHURST ROAD
Plans for ten houses were submitted in 1890 (R.B. 20.3.1890). The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built.
OATLANDS ROAD
Plans were deposited for six houses in 1890 (R.B. 20.3.1890). The name was taken from Oatlands, a house on the east side of the Hertford Road marked on the 1867 O.S.
OLD FORGE ROAD
The present name dates from 1930 (K.). It derives from the former forge that stood at the junction with Forty Hill. The forge is marked on the 1867 O.S. and subsequent editions to 1914. Prior to 1930 the road does not seem to have had a name. No name appears on the O.S. maps of 1867, 1896 and 1914 nor on the auctioneer's plan of the Bridgenhall Estate of 1868.
OLD PARK AVENUE
The road had been laid out by 1913 (K.). It is on the line of one of the former drives to Old Park. See also Carr's Lane.
OLD PARK RIDINGS
Part of the Grange Park Estate developed by Richard Metherell. (See The Chine.) The first houses were occupied in 1910 (K.). The area formed part of Old Park. The house survives as the Club house of Bush Hill Park Golf Club.
OLD PARK ROAD
Plans were submitted for the Old Park Estate in 1880 (R.B. 24.6.1880). Old Park Road was in existence in 1806 as a private road giving access to Old Park Farm (E.A.). See also Crescent Road and Waverley Road.
OLD ROAD
A section of the Hertford Road by-passed when a cut-off road was built probably C.1830. A plan for the work (undated) is in the possession of the L.B. of Enfield Libraries.
ORCHARD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1906 (K.). The 1914 O.S. shows the road only partly built.
ORDNANCE ROAD
Like Lincoln Road, it has been known by a great variety of names. In 1754 it was known as Marsh Lane (T.M.). In 1806 it was known as Welches Lane (E.A.). This name appears on the 1867 O.S. The name Lock Lane appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1867. An auctioneer's plan of 1869 calls it Ordnance Factory Lane. The present name was in use by 1871 (Ce.).
OSBORNE ROAD
Plans for a pair of villas were submitted in 1889 (R.B. 2.5.1889). It was almost certainly named after Queen Victoria's house on the Isle of Wight.
OXFORD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1909 (K.).
PAINTERS LANE
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). It was alternatively known as Pentrich Lane (R.B. 6.12.1867). Painters is almost certainly a corruption of Pentrich. The name Pentrich derives from the former Manor of Honylands and Pentriches.
PALACE GARDENS
Partly built by 1899 (K.). The name derives from the former Manor House (mis-named the Palace) on whose grounds it was built.
PALMER5 LANE
This was listed as a private road in the Enfield Enclosure Award of 1806. It has been known by a great variety of names. The plan for the Old Road diversion (C.1830) shows it as Troll's Lane. In the 1851 Census it is called Old Red Lyon Lane. However in the General Board of Health report on Enfield (1850) it is called White Lion Lane. Both these names are derived from former public houses in Old Road. In 1873 it was known as Hall Lane (R.B. 14.2.1873). This name is probably connected with Hall's Farm which was listed in Old Road in the 1871 Census.
PARK CORNER
A former name for the junction of Green Dragon Lane and Worlds End Lane. It appears on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777 and the 1867 0.S. The name is clearly drawn from the adjacent Old Park Estate.
PARK CRESCENT
The first houses were occupied in 1914 (K.). The name is probably derived from the nearby Town Park, bought by Enfield U.D.C. in 1901.
PARK ROAD
Plans for one cottage were submitted in 1890 (R.B. 14.1.1890).
PARSONAGE LANE
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). The name is probably connected with the former Rectory (or Parsonage) Manor House which stood at the junction with Baker Street. It was sometimes known as Parson's Lane (A.C. 1773). It was known by its present name in 1572 (S.).
PERCIVAL ROAD
Part of the Salisbury Estate. Plans for nine houses were submitted in July 1885 (R.B. 30.7.1885) followed a month later by plans for seven shops (R.B. 14.8.1885).
PHIPPS HATCH LANE
The name recalls a former gate to Enfield Chase.
PIPERS YARD
A group of cottages formerly situated off Clay Hill (R.B. 11.12.1881). The name was clearly connected with either Little Pipers or Great Pipers (now Bramley House).
PLOUGH PASSAGE
A group of highly insanitary cottages situated off the Hertford Road opposite St. James' Church. The drains had the unfortunate habit of overflowing on to the pavement (R.B. 15.12.1876). The name derived from a nearby public house. It was also known as St. Patrick's Terrace (R.B. 2.7.1885). This is probably the same place as Patrick's Row (G.B.H. 1850). The cottages were copyhold of the Manor of Enfield. In 1839 they were owned by one Charlotte Patrick.
POSTERN CORNER
A former name for the junction of Windmill Hill and the Ridgeway. It appears on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777.
POYNTER ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1902 (K.). It was named after Sir Edward Poynter (1836-1919) a distinguished painter and president of the Royal Academy. See also Leighton Road, Landseer Road and Millais Road.
PRIMROSE AVENUE
This road was built in two halves. The Baker Street end was probably built in the early eighteen-sixties and was marked on the 1867 O.S. as Canton Road. The Lavender Road end, called Primrose Avenue, was built as part of the Birkbeck Estate. Plans for a cottage were submitted in 1881 (R.B. 6.1.1881).
PRIVATE ROAD
Part of the Bush Hill Park Estate. The road appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1878.
PUTNEY ROAD
Land belonging to Putney Lodge (situated on the east side of the Hertford Road) was sold for building in 1867 (A.C.). The road had been partly built by 1871 (Ce.).
QUEENS ROAD
Part of the Moat House Estate bought by the Conservative Land Society C. 1854. The 1867 O.S. shows the road laid out but with no houses built. The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). See also Burleigh Road and Stanley Road.
QUEENSWAY
The eastern end of the road follows the alignment of a former cul-de-sac from Ponders End High Street known as Goat Lane. It was so-called in 1851 (Ce.). The name came from the Goat P.H. in Ponders End High Street.
RADCLYFFE AVENUE
Shown in outline on the 1914 O.S. No houses had yet been built.
RALEIGH ROAD
Part of the Enfield New Town development commenced in 1853. See Cecil Road.
THE RIDE
The former drive to Durants Arbour. In 1754 it was called Durance Lane (T.M.).
RAYNTON ROAD
The 1896 0.S. shows the road complete. The name derives from Sir Nicholas Raynton who built Forty Hall in 1629.
THE RIDGEWAY
So-called on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777.
RIDLER ROAD
The first houses were occupied by 1904 (K.). The name probably derives from Joseph Frederick Ridler who owned a butcher's shop in Baker Street (K. 1899).
RILEY ROAD
A building notice for two houses was submitted in 1872 (R.B. 20.12.1872). See also Ingersoll Road.
RIVER FRONT
Plans for one house were deposited in 1892 (R.B. 18.2.1892). The name reflects the proximity of the New River.
RIVER VIEW
Originally called River Bank, it acquired its present name in 1912 (K.). It fronts on to the New River.
ROSEMARY AVENUE
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. It was originally a cul-de-sac from Lavender Road. Plans for one house were deposited in 1881 (R.B. 1.7.1881). The section linking up with Baker Street had been built by 1903 and was originally known as Montague Road (K.).
ROTHERFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied 1904 (K.).
ROWANTREE ROAD
Part of the Bycullah Estate, developed from 1878. The road was named after Mr. Culloden Rowan, the developer.
RUSSELL ROAD
Part of the Bridgenhall Estate which was broken up for building in 1868. The name appears on the auctioneer's plan. The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.). The road was probably named after the prominent Liberal politician Lord John Russell (1792-1878).
ST. ANDREW'S ROAD
Part of the New River Estate. Plans for two villas were submitted in 1884 (R.B. 3.4.1884). The 1896 O.S. shows houses on the west side of the road only. Enfield Parish Church is dedicated to St. Andrew.
ST. GEORGE'S ROAD
Part of the Bridgenhall Estate. The road appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1868. Plans for a pair of villas were submitted in 1886 (R.B. 30.6.1886).
ST. JAMES' ROAD
This road is shown partly built on an auctioneer's plan of 1881. The name probably derives from St. James' Church in the Hertford Road.
ST. MARK'S ROAD
The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built. St. Mark's Church was built in 1893.
ST. STEPHEN'S ROAD
Part of the Prospect House Estate. In 1889 six houses under construction were found to have been built with bad mortar (R.B. 30.5.1889).
SALISBURY ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.).
SANDER'S CORNER
A former name for the junction of Cattlegate Road and Theobalds Park Road. It appears on the 1867 0.S.
SARNESFIELD ROAD
Part of the Chase Side Building Estate. The road appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1900. It had been built by 1901 (K.).
SAVILLE ROW
Marked on 1867 O.S. The name is probably an ironic allusion to its more prestigious namesake in W1.
SCOTLAND GREEN ROAD
The name Scotland Green was in use by 1754 (T.M.). There is also a Scotland Green in Tottenham. See also Ireland Green. In 1572 a road known as Cranes Lane ran northwards from South Street to Green Street (S.).
SEAFORD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.). Seaford is a small town in Sussex near Newhaven.
SHIRLEY ROAD
The grounds of Shirley Lodge on Windmill Hill were sold for building in 1879 (A.C.). Plans for houses were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 13.5.1880). The road was made up in 1887 (R.B. 12.5.1887).
SILVER STREET
The 1754 Tithe Map and the 1806 Enclosure Award Map both show Silver Street as part of Baker Street. The name Silver Street was in use by 1826 (Pigot's Directory). There is also a Silver Street in Edmonton. In 1572 Silver Street and the southern end of Baker Street went under the name of Parsonage Street (S.).
SKETTY ROAD
Under construction in 1903. The first houses were occupied in 1904 (K.). Sketty is a suburb of Swansea.
SLADES HILL
Originally part of East Barnet Road. (See Enfield Road.) The present name was in use by 1874 (R.B. 15.5.1874). A farmer called John Slade lived here in 1851 (Ce.).
SOHAM ROAD
A water main was laid in 1889 (R.B. 19.9.1889). The road is probably named after Soham, a small town in Cambridgeshire.
SOUTH PLACE
A row of cottages formerly situated to the north of South Street. They suffered from bad drainage and overcrowding (G.B.H.).
SOUTH STREET
So-called on Morden's Map of Middlesex (1695). It was called South Street in 1572 (S.).
SOUTHBURY ROAD
Previously known as Nags Head Lane from the former public house of that name in Enfield Town. The Enfield Local Board of Health re-named it Southbury Road 18th August 1882. (The name Southbury derives from a neighbouring field.) A minority on the Local Board wanted to call it Great Eastern Road. Prior to enclosure (1806) the road existed as two small lanes, one from Ponders End, one from Enfield Town. The two halves were not linked until after enclosure. The Enfield Town end was usually known as Nags Head Lane but was sometimes called Oldbury Lane (A.C.1787). The eastern end was known as Farm Lane (E.A. 1806). In 1572 the western end was called Bury Lane (S.).
SOUTHFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1905 (K.).
STAGG HILL
The name probably derives from a public house called the Bald Faced Stag in Cockfosters Road.
STANDARD ROAD
Plans for six cottages were submitted by the Standard Freehold Land Society in January 1886 (R.B. 29.1.1886). Later the same year builders were caught mixing mortar with sand scraped from the road (R.B. 23.10.1886).
STANLEY ROAD
Part of the Moat House Estate bought by the Conservative Land Society C.1854. The 1867 0.S. shows the road laid out but no houses built. The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.). Stanley is the family name of the Earls of Derby. The 14th Earl of Derby was prime minister 1852, 1858-9 and 1866-8. See also Burleigh Road and Queens Road.
STANLEY STREET
A water main was laid in 1882 (R.B. 7.12.1882). The name possibly derives from Henry Morton Stanley who shot to public prominence in the eighteen-seventies after his successful expedition to find David Livingstone in Africa.
STATION ROAD
Part of the Shirley Lodge Estate. Plans for two houses were submitted in 1880 (R.B. 15.7.1880). The name reflects the proximity of the Great Northern Railway station on Windmill Hill. See also Shirley Road.
STERLING ROAD
Part of the Woodlands Estate, developed from 1883. It was originally known as Wellington Road, but acquired its present name in 1911 (K.).
STOCKINGSWATER LANE
So-called in 1754(T.M.). It is called Stocking Lane on Morden's Map of Middlesex (1695). Stocking was the name of a field which lay to the south of the road (T.M.).
STRAYFIELD ROAD
So-called in 1806 (E.A.). In 1572 it was known as Moorhatch Gate Street (S.). Moorhatch was a former gate to Enfield Chase.
SUEZ ROAD
Plans for one cottage were deposited in 1886 (R.B. 29.1.1886). The Suez Canal was opened in 1869 and in 1875 a large block of shares in the concern were bought by the British government.
SUFFOLK ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1909 (K.).
SUTHERLAND ROAD
Probably built in the early eighteen-nineties. The road appears on the 1896 O.S.
SWANSEA ROAD
Laid out by 1906 (K.). No houses were built until after World War I. See also Aberdare Road, Brecon Road and Glyn Road. SWIN'S ROW A row of cottages formerly standing off the west side of the Hertford Road north of the Bell (G.B.H.).
SYDNEY ROAD
The bulk of the road was laid out in 1853 as part of the Enfield New Town Development. (See Cecil Road.) The section adjoining the Town is rather older. It was known as Slaughterhouse Lane in 1850 (G.B.H.). A turning on the east side leading to the former Enfield Gas works (opened 1850) was known as Gas House Lane (R.B. 3.11.1865).
TENNISWOOD ROAD
This road is essentially a product of the nineteen-thirties. The first houses were occupied in 1935. However, the section east of Churchbury Lane follows the alignment of the former drive to Churchbury Farm. The section west of Churchbury Lane was known as Brewhouse Lane in 1806 (E.A.). (A brewery stood on the site of the western end of Canonbury Road.) After the building of Canonbury Road, Brewhouse Lane ceased to be of any importance as a link between Baker Street and Churchbury Lane and degenerated into a muddy cart track. In the nineteen-fifties it was known to Willow Estate residents as 'the alleyway'. In 1966 after the building of houses, this section was made up and incorporated into Tenniswood Road.
THEOBALDS PARK ROAD
So-called in 1806 (E.A.). Theobalds Park is situated at the northern end of the road.
TITCHFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1901 (K.).
TOTTERIDGE ROAD
Part of the Putney Lodge Estate, sold for building in 1867 (A.C.). It was partly built by 1871 (Ce.). A Totteridge House, standing in the Hertford Road, appears on the 1867 0.S.
THE TOWN
The present name was in use by 1754 (T.M.). In 1572 it was known as Enfield Grene (S.). The former green was progressively encroached upon and now the only surviving remnant is the small paved area surrounding the fountain.
TRINITY AVENUE
The first houses were occupied in 1907 (K.). It was originally known as St. James' Road. Trinity College Cambridge are patrons of the living of Enfield.
TRINITY STREET
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.).
TURKEY STREET
Called Tuttle Street on Morden's Map of Middlesex (1695) and Tuckey Street on Cary's Map of Middlesex (1789). In 1572 it was known by its present name (S.).
UCKFIELD ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.).
UPLANDS PARK ROAD
Plans for a house were deposited in 1884 (R.B. 3.7.1884). The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built.
VICTORIA ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1903 (K.). Queen Victoria died in 1901.
VIGA ROAD
Shown in outline on the 1914 0.S. It had not then been named.
VILLAGE ROAD
The Bush Hill Park Estate was sold for building in 1871 (A.C.). The first houses were offered for sale in 1878 (A.C.). The road was partly in Edmonton.
VINE LANE
A former cul-de-sac off the south side of Church Street, west of Sydney Road. Prior to 1632 a house called The Vine occupied the site of the Market Place. It was sometimes called Palace Lane (Ce. 1851). The site is now covered by Pearsons department store.
VIOLET AVENUE
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. It appears on an auctioneer's plan of 1887.
WAGON ROAD
So-called on the 1867 O.S. It is marked on the Enfield Chase Enclosure Map of 1777. It was sometimes known as Long Hill (R.B. 7.3.1876).
WALSINGHAM ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1910 (K.). The name is probably a continuation of the policy begun on the adjoining Enfield New Town development of naming the roads after Elizabethan worthies. See Cecil Road.
WALTON STREET
Part of the Laurel Bank Estate. The 1896 O.S. shows houses on the east side only.
WARWICK ROAD
Probably built in the early eighteen-sixties. It is marked on the 1867 0.S. Being very low-lying it suffered from drainage problems (R.B. 10.11.1871).
WAVERLEY ROAD
Part of the Old Park Estate developed from 1880. Plans for one house were deposited in 1883 (R.B. 17.3.1883). The name suggests that the developer must have been acquainted with the novels of Sir Walter Scott. See also Crescent Road and Old Park Road.
WELLINGTON PLACE
A group of cottages formerly situated to the south of Whitewebbs Lane. The cottages were of early 19th century date and were probably named after the Duke of Wellington.
WELLINGTON ROAD
Part of the Bush Hill Park Estate, sold for building in 1971 (A.C.). The first houses were offered for sale in 1878 (A.C.). The road was partly in Edmonton. It was probably named after the Duke of Wellington.
WESTMOOR ROAD
The first houses were occupied in 1906. The 1867 O.S. shows a Westmoor House and a Westmoor Farm situated on the north side of Green Street.
WHARF ROAD
So-called in 1909 (K.). The name reflects the proximity of the Ponders End Wharf on the Lee Navigation. It was previously known as Mill Lane or Mill Road (R.B. 7.10.1870). It forms the approach to Ponders End Mill.
WHITEHOUSE LANE
Previously called Hawkings Lane (K.1903). It had acquired its present name by 1909 (K.).
WHITEWEBBS LANE
So-called in 1754 (T.M.). At that time only the eastern end of the road was in existence. Near the King and Tinker it terminated at a gate into Enfield Chase. The present name was in use in 1572 but, at the same time, part of the road went under the name of Romey Street.
WINDMILL HILL
So-called in 1851 (Ce.). The name is derived from the Windmill which stood at the junction of Old Park Road until its demolition in 1904.
WOODBINE GROVE
Part of the Birkbeck Estate. The road is marked on an auctioneer's plan of 1887. Plans for one house were submitted in 1893 (R.B. 13.4.1893). The 1896 O.S. shows the road partly built.
WOODLANDS ROAD
The Woodlands Estate was under construction by 1883 when some of the houses were discovered to have been jerry-built (R.B. 5.1.1883). The 1867 O.S. shows a house called the Woodlands on the east side of Brigadier Hill.
WOODSIDE COTTAGES
A small group of cottages situated to the east of Cockfosters Road, north of the junction with Bramley Road. They appear on the 1867 O.S. They were demolished 0.1935 and the site is now covered by a parade of shops.
WORLDS END LANE
Prior to 1934 this road was in Southgate (Edmonton before 1881), but the land on either side of it was in Enfield. In 1934 Worlds End Lane was transferred to Enfield and Southgate was compensated with a portion of Cockfosters. The name appears on the 1867 O.S. The name is obviously an ironic allusion to its remote situation. See also Botany Bay.
YORK TERRACE
A water main was laid in 1888. It was originally known as York Crescent (R.B. 3.5.1888).

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